• News

    Apple enforces new rigid app privacy requirements

    Apple has made a bold move to pull the plug on app makers’ privacy foul play. The new rules now in effect require that every developer provides a clear-cut summary of what types of data their products collect. This is expected to raise users’ awareness of the potential privacy roadblocks they may hit down the road when using a particular application.
  • News

    Unencrypted Gatekeeper data puts Mac users’ privacy at risk

    Apple’s terrific track record of keeping macOS safe from malicious apps is a double-edged sword. Recent findings of security enthusiasts about a Gatekeeper quirk demonstrate that the trade-off between security and privacy is a nontrivial one. Before elaborating on this issue further, let’s recall what this feature is intended to do in the first place. When a user tries to run an app, it checks the code against a database of known-harmful software.
  • News

    Vietnamese state-sponsored malware campaign targeting Macs

    The unorthodox Mac malware strain with backdoor capabilities has code overlaps and shares some behavior patterns with earlier threats distributed by the OceanLotus Advanced Persistent Threat group. Also referred to as APT32, this gang is considered to have a connection with the Vietnamese authorities. It has been previously spotted in plots aiming to perpetrate industrial espionage attacks...
  • News

    Long-standing Safari bug could fuel misinformation campaigns

    The bug allowing this unorthodox exploitation to occur was originally spotted by the MacRumors website crew almost two years ago (in February 2019). In a nutshell, it boils down to an imperfection in the link-sharing feature of Safari on iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch mobile devices. While allowing anyone to add a text excerpt from an arbitrary article to the iMessage link preview...

Reviews

How-Tos

  • How-Tos

    Remove Search Marquis virus from Mac

    The “nobleman” theme continues to be the trend in the cybercrime ecosystem that exploits Mac computers via a massive web traffic redistribution scheme. The Search Baron browser hijacker, which splashed onto the scene in July 2019, has been superseded by Search Marquis culprit. Both act in a similar fashion, forwarding the victims to Bing in the long run. Here’s a full security report on this brand new infection.
  • How-Tos

    How to change default search engine on Mac

    With the emergence of search engines back in the 1990s, the World Wide Web got arguably the most significant boost of all time. Nowadays, billions of searches are being processed by Google every single day, let alone the statistics for popular competing services. This digital area is thriving and users have the freedom to use the provider they prefer. All it takes is a little bit of settings tweaking in a web browser.
  • How-Tos

    Remove Chrome redirect virus from Mac

    Bad actors out there appear to interpret the popularity of Google Chrome as a call to action. When a new Mac adware nasty is released, it almost certainly supports this web browser otherwise the attack surface is potentially limited. Redirect viruses and ad-injectors are literally swarming in this environment, making numerous users go through trial and error trying to fix things. This article describes the prevalent forms of the Chrome redirect virus Mac and provides a shortcut to removing it.
  • How-Tos

    Get rid of Adobe Flash Player Uninstaller Mac pop-up

    Social engineering hoaxes and Mac malware distribution campaigns go hand in hand. The fundamental principle of this tandem is about duping a user into installing a piece of harmful code that mimics a legitimate product. This has been the case with the infamous Adobe Flash Player update scam for years. Now that Adobe is dropping support of this nearly obsolete software, crooks are busy spreading malicious apps under the guise of the Flash Player Uninstaller tool.
  • How-Tos

    Remove ib-search virus from Mac

    Cybercrime married browser takeover a long time ago. This is one of the longest-running plots in the Mac area that yields lucrative results for bad actors by bringing large amounts of traffic monetization revenue. The idea is to redirect users to rogue search engines such as ib-search via a series of domains constituting ad networks. If this type of a hijack kicks in, reverting to correct web preferences is easier said than done. It’s doable, though. This article will explain how.